Kurds make up a significant proportion of the population in Europe with a migrant background. Their number is estimated at nearly two million.

Like other migrants also our parents and grandparents came as so-called guest workers, many also as political refugees. What we all share is the fact that we’ve found a new home in Europe where we can freely develop our potentials as individuals.

In particular, the younger generation is increasingly making use of the possibility to pursue an academic career. Kurdish doctors, engineers, teachers, business people, economists and lawyers are and will become an increasingly integral part of social life and the labor market in Europe.

As university graduates of Kurdish-European origin, we are committed and well placed in Europe and beyond to build bridges between migrants and non-migrants. Many of us have already been doing this at the individual level and in local associations. With the establishment of the Kurdish-European Society we have joined forces and created a new, dynamic platform for our social engagement at the European level. Thanks to our intercultural expertise, we wish to contribute to an increasingly diverse society in Europe.

We aim at promoting the cooperation between the various institutions in Europe and the relevant institutions in the mainly Kurdish populated regions in the Middle East. In these regions, we advocate self-determination for the Kurds, rule of law and democratic structures as well as protection of minority rights.

In particular, recently, the mainly Kurdish parts of Iraq and Syria have become the focus of international attention due to their fight against the so-called Islamic State.

In Turkey, after decades of civil war-like clashes with many casualties on both sides significant developments occurred that made appear a democratic participation of the Kurdish population tangible. However, ever since the coup in Turkey the future of the Kurds there remains uncertain and under current circumstances, a peaceful solution to the Kurdish question does not seem realistic.

Also in Iranian-Kurdistan, millions of Kurds cannot put expectations high as to their collective rights being recognized by Iran in the near future.

Regardless of the country and the specific situation in which the Kurds find themselves in all Kurds in the region have in common that they need international support to build their future.

Moreover, it is necessary to create the appropriate legal framework to attract businesses and international investments, which would contribute to stabilizing the region.

We as the Kurdish-European Society are committed to the integration of the Kurdish community and other migrant groups in the different countries in Europe. As a result, we wish to contribute to a common European Asylum and Immigration Law and have a voice in the immigration debate.

Members of our associations are scientists, officials, university graduates with different backgrounds and students from all over Europe.

Everyone is welcome to participate actively. The Kurdish-European Society and its member associations are open to all, regardless of their origin.

Finally, we would like to stress that we are politically and economically fully independent.